Projects

Why so many projects, you may ask? If you're not wondering, skip down and read about the books I’m working on. But if you’re curious why I’m not just focusing on one book, the reason is that I love participating in National Novel Writing Month (nanowrimo). If you aren’t familiar with nanowrimo, it’s a super fun organization that challenges you to write a novel during the month of November. But here’s the plot twist. The word novel is used loosely and is open to interpretation. The real requirement is that you write 50,000 words. Every November, this certainly feels like a novel-worthy feat, but most books are closer to 80,000 words, some less, some a lot more. I’ve started a project a year since 2016, and have spent the time in between finishing and revising. And revising some more. And then revising a little more. I’m looking forward to getting these nanowrimo babies into the world soon!

Guerilla Love

Guerilla Love

All sixteen-year-old Cordelia Sullivan wants is to make a festival-winning documentary with her best friend Drew and prove to her parents that her film-making aspirations aren’t a waste of time. Now she just needs a festival-winning idea. When she finds her uber-popular, older sister’s hidden—and heavily-annotated—manual on how to win the war of love, Cordelia seizes the opportunity. Exposing her sister's use of manipulative guerilla love tactics is just what Cordelia needs to win the film festival. Publicly humiliating said sister is just a bonus. Drew isn’t sold but agrees to film Cordelia following the book’s terrible advice hidden-camera style, as long as he gets to the pick the guy—Brennan Fox, the school’s star football player and Cordelia’s long-held secret crush. Cordelia’s more shocked than anyone when the book’s advice works, but while Brennan may be falling for Cordelia, the rest of her life is falling apart.

Off Book

Off Book

Seventeen-year-old Lucy Carmichael always assumed her life would be perfect if math-boy-genius Ryan Billings would just do one simple calculation and see that the two of them equal forever. But on the same day he finally kisses her, Lucy gets accepted to a prestigious summer acting program with a potential prize scholarship which means no last summer with Ryan before he leaves for college. To make matters worse, her success at camp is tied to her scene partner, Hollywood royalty A.J. Whitman (yes, his father is the August Whitman) who thinks the whole camp is a joke and has no plans to even act like he’s making an effort. Except something about the way Lucy calls him on his crap starts to chisel away his resolve, and Lucy realizes there’s a much darker story behind the pretty-boy mask than the tabloids report. Is she willing to risk the safe by-the-numbers happy ending she thought she wanted for a broken boy who makes her feel too much?

Melt With You

Melt With You

On the surface, golden-boy Spencer has the perfect life. He’s a good student, popular, with a starting spot on the baseball team and a gorgeous girlfriend. No one suspects how far off the deep end his mother has gone in looking for his absentee father. Amanda’s life is the exact opposite. A self-proclaimed social outcast, she’s one failed test away from not graduating high school and her uber supportive parents only make her feel worse. The only thing the two have in common is their mutual dislike of each other, and both are less then thrilled when they end up in detention together. But then time literally stops for a second when Amanda accidentally touches Spencer, and they realize that together they might have a superpower that can solve all of their problems—if they don’t kill each other trying to figure out how to work together.

© 2019 Mary Chase
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